There is so much to see and do within this part of the Lake District, and we have tried to provide an idea of the range of activities and places to visit to help you plan your stay.

Kings Arms Hotel

There are four fantastic Pubs in the Village of Hawkshead and numerous cafe's. For a fantastic feed and 10% off your food I recommend the Kings Arms Hotel.


Windermere Lake Cruisers

The largest of all the lakes. Cruises run throughout the year, from Waterhead, (Ambleside), Bowness and Lakeside at the Southern end of the lake.






Grizedale Forest

Grizedale Forest is just 3 miles from Hawkshead, and is well worth a visit. There is a Visitor centre from where guided trails lead to various parts of the forest. Amongst the highlights on these trails are some superb and often unexpected view points, and a number of unique woodland sculptures, some of which can be played like musical instruments. There are also a number of cycle trails and cycle hire is available at the visitor centre.

Go Ape - Swing through the trees at Grizedale or Whinlatter (Keswick).
Literary Heritage

Few regions of England have a literary heritage that is as rich and varied as that of the Lake District. Writers, poets and artists have long been attracted to the area, and the most famous of these, William Wordsworth, was born at Cockermouth, lived for a short time in Penrith, was schooled in Hawkshead, and for much of his life lived at Grasmere and Rydal.

Consequently there are a large number of sites with direct links to William Wordsworth, and following the Wordsworth trail could take up an entire holiday. His birthplace in Cockermouth, the Grammar
School in Hawkshead, and his homes at Dove Cottage, (Grasmere) and Rydal Mount are all open to the public. ​
The Beatrix Potter Gallery

The Beatrix Potter Gallery, is worth a visit in the square at Hawkshead.
John Ruskin

John Ruskin, the artist, writer and critic lived for the latter part of his life at Brantwood, which stands on the East Side of Coniston water. The house is now open to the public, and well worth a visit.

Several other literary heroes are associated with the Lake District, including Hugh Walpole, Arthur Ransome, Harriet Martinique, and more recently, the poet Norman Nicholson.
Coniston Launch

Here you can cruise in style on board the world's oldest steam operated yacht, The Gondola. Built in 1860, this fine vessel cruises sedately across Coniston Water, from Coniston village to the East side of the Lake. Here, passengers may disembark to enjoy a walk, or visit Brantwood, the home of the artist John Ruskin. The views from the east side of Coniston are among the finest in the world.


Other useful links
  • Explore The wilds of Cumbria with this fantastic driving experience - www.kankku.co.uk
  • Mountain goat tours - www.mountain-goat.co.uk
  • Cumbrian tourism - www.golakes.co.uk
  • Met Office - www.metoffice.co.uk
  • Windermere ferry cam - www.fba.org.uk/ferry-cam